PUNK BLACK Brings the ATL Scene to NYC

We first discovered the PUNK BLACK collective on Instagram a couple years back. Instagram has become a great repository of 15-30 sec clips of underground music captured in real-time from all over the globe. When I saw these little snippets of this Atlanta, Georgia based community moshing and rocking out in Cosplay – I sensed they were on to something heavy, gritty, and real for young folks of color. Each year the collective explores new ways to engage local youth and share an underground truth most people don’t know. More Black and Brown youth in America than you realize love rock music. From punk to death metal, it’s actually a thing. And though thousands of us can’t meet up as often we’d like, when we do, its a beautiful moment of braids flying, hips swaying and faces glowing.

PUNK BLACK (PB) is expanding its reach this summer by presenting an NYC music fest in Brooklyn on August 22, 2018. As Von Phoenix, one of PB’s founders tells it, “We’d like to create a space in NY were PoC can feel at home while doing what they love, as well as plant the seeds for a PB Chapter in New York. Not to mention we want to have fun (maybe, *ahem* get a little sauced) and see some kick ass bands.”

We asked Von about the upcoming NYC event, and how the collective came to be. Check it out.


Who founded the PUNK BLACK collective?

The original founders of PUNK BLACK (PB) are Kharis Ellison – age 26, Arkkade Kult – age 38, Jamee Cornelia- age 25, and myself Von Phoenix – age 28. There are 6 of us in the primary collective not counting contributors.

What inspired you to create Punk Black and the need for more representation in the scene?

I discovered rock music around age 12, and I noticed right away that I didn’t see many People of Color (POC) in main stream bands. Around that time I was still trapped in the notion that Rock music was created by white people, and POC weren’t really fond of it. This of course made me feel even more like the odd man out, and unfortunately fueled my self-hate phase at the time. It wasn’t until I started a band at the end of high school did I realize how bad the lack of representation was on the scene. Being an all Black band we got all kinds of looks, condescending remarks, and general hate.PUNK bLACK QUOTE

Was Cosplay always a part of the Atlanta Punk Scene? The collective seems to fill a need for youth interested in all things alternative, was that a natural progression?

Not that I know of. I definitely know a lot of cosplayers who like punk, and a lot of punk fans who like cosplay/anime/comics. It was a natural progression for us, as most of the collective grew up being influence by anime, and our designs have always been anime influenced.

About Community organizing, was finding space for shows and funding new projects something you had previous experience doing?

Definitely not. We had played a lot of shows before the first PB, but we had never really put on our own show, let alone organize a monthly event.

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Photo courtesy of PUNK BLACK

Access to creative space is one of the key barriers for artists in NYC, how was it navigating venues in Atlanta?

When we started in 2015 it was a lot easier to find venues in ATL, but as time goes on it’s getting more and more difficult. We normally like to use a combination of house and DIY venues but as the siege of gentrification intensifies, we lose more venues. Over the last year we’ve luckily found a home base at Union EAV, which has been an awesome help to the movement.

When did you first get the idea to launch an event in NYC and what drew you to this city?

NY has always been one of the places we thought about setting up another chapter of PB, but it was when we were contacted by Mecca Shabazz earlier this year that we realized we could actually make it happen. She’s now our NY event director, and our eyes in New York. New York’s new scene is definitely what drew us to the city. It’s been the birthplace of things like Punx of Color, AfroPunk, and dope ass bands over the years. (Shout out to Shinobi Ninja).

Are there a couple organizations out there you admire? Why do you admire them?

Definitely Southern Fried Queer Pride (SFQP) in Atlanta and Punx of Color in New York. SFQP promotes and features the LGBT art community through events and festivals, and their style and the way they run things is really dope. I’ve been following Punx of Color for a few years now, and though I haven’t been able to make it to an event I can tell that do great work for punks of color. It shows not only in the numbers, but in the reactions of the community they serve. I’ve only seen and heard good things about them, and after speaking with Gayla Brooks I can tell they try to do what’s best for the community as a whole. I think both of these organizations think about the community first, which is one of the hardcore reasons I dig them both as well.

Pre-Order Our Summer Zine

Ahh, it’s crazy y’all. We tried a new printer this time and we are so pleased with the bright colors and glossy pics.

Only did a short run of 30 copies for now but we’ll probably print more for live events as the season kicks off. Keeping our prices under $10 for the youth so head over to Etsy to see the deets on this fun and fresh #blkgrlswurld zine 😘

The Acacia Strain Deliver A Properly Heavy Summer

If you ever catch us on Instagram, you’ll know we’ve been headbanging at the heaviest NYC metal shows all summer. Much of it having to do with saying goodbye to our fav venue, Webster Hall, set to close for the next 18 months and less likely to book heavy music when it reopens. Another safe haven for new metalbands lost to corporate takeovers, grr.

I’d been patiently waiting for east coast band, The Acacia Strain to finish up the Vans Warped Tour this year and bring on the jams to NYC, when I heard about a new album they were dropping in late June. Yassss. Idunno what it is about doomy metalcore music, but what I like most about their style are the playful moments in their songs when the time signatures get screwy and unpredictable. This doesn’t happen as often as say, a composition from The Dillinger Escape Plan, but I enjoy the surprise when Acacia Strain explores this.

 

I found their newest album, Gravebloom to be their most polished project so far. A quality to the recording and mastering that leaves previous works like Coma Witch sounding more scratchy unfinished somehow. Not that there’s anything wrong witha rougher sound but, its nice to hear an artist tightening up their craft and focusing on the best elements of their songwriting.

Nothing trumps hearing their songs live, but Gravebloom has some great moments – enough to be added to our #blkgrlswurld Spotify playlist.

Songs we enjoyed from this album include, “Bitter Pill”, “Abyssal Depths”, and “Cold Gloom.” They each have a churning heaviness in their rhythm, the sort that makes you wanna stomp around the mosh pit like some 100ft Godzilla…or you know, in your living room wearing pajamas while growling at your cat. For me, this sort of metal is cathartic, calming and allows me to rest. I realize others have more stimulating reactions, lol- the point is, The Acacia Strain’s latest work is quite satisfying and a great soundtrack for our summer in this big ‘ol city.

I look forward to catching them touring this live.

##blkgrlswurld

Zine Fair at MoMA PS1 Music Fest, March 26th

MoMA PS1 and Other Music Present
Come Together: Music Festival and Label Market

Sunday, March 26th, 2017
12PM-6PM

Coming up next week, #Blkgrlswurld Zine will join the Zine tables lead by Suffragette City art collective at the record label fair taking place during the music fest. Both labels and zinesters will be selling underground wares full of indie funk and style. We’ll have the latest Riso prints of our Zine and special variant editions.

*Access to the label/zine fair is free with museum admission. Events and screenings in the VW Dome are ticketed, $13-$15

Collaborative performances in the VW Dome celebrate the intersecting communities that make for a vibrant music scene. With Black Quantum Futurism (Moor Mother & Rasheedah Phillips), Matana Roberts, GENG, Hisham Akira Bharoocha, Brian Chase, Ryan Sawyer, Robert AA Lowe, Greta Kline, a.k.a. Frankie Cosmos, and more.

Panel discussions feature some of the most innovative individuals in music, including Ric Leichtung, Matt Conboy, Douglas Sherman, Esneider Arevalo, Delphine Blue, Brian Turner, and Francois Vaxelaire.

The New York City premiere of the film A Life in Waves, follows the life and innovations of composer and electronic music pioneer Suzanne Ciani, directed by Brett Whitcomb and written and edited by Bradford Thomason.

#Blkgrlswurld @ Brown Paper Zine Fair Jan. 28-29, 2017

#Blkgrlswurld ZINE will be selling our latest editions and coloring books Jan, 28-29th, 2017 at the Brown Paper Zine and Small Press Fair for Black and PoC Artists. The free event takes place at the Museum of Contemporary African Diasporan Arts (MoCADA). Details below.

MoCADA (80 Hanson Place, Brooklyn, NY) – 1st and 4th Floors Free RSVP

We are also thrilled to participate in a panel discussion on Sunday during the zine fair, moderated by Kimberly Drew. Social Sunday: Black Ink Zine Panel Sunday, January 29, 2:30-4pm Free RSVP

3 Dot Zine presents its first installment of the Brown Paper Zine and Small Press Fair for Black and PoC Artists as a part of programming for Diagram of the Heart, by Glenna Gordon, currently on view at the Museum of Contemporary African Diasporan Arts (MoCADA).

3 Dot Zine is a collaborative submission based zine founded by artist Devin N Morris in 2014 as a way to extend the reach of important dialogues Morris was having with his peers.Throughout his time participating in zine fairs and festivals in New York, Baltimore, and Philadelphia, he noticed a lack of Black and People of Color (PoC) representation within these environments, which stood in stark contrast to the diverse independent publishing communities Morris found himself apart of.

As such, the Brown Paper Zine and Small Press Fair was created to provide a space where the creative efforts of Black and PoC artists working in print mediums could be exposed and proliferated. Bringing together established zine makers, small presses, and artists working in print mediums to MoCADA, the fair asks each participant to seek out new and young artists to showcase their zines, or facilitate the production of their print-based work. In addition to encouraging young artists to use zines as a viable, independent avenue for sharing their work, this effort also acquaints young makers with the communities that fairs create.

The Brown Paper Zine and Small Press Fair will occupy multiple locations within the MoCADA building as the weekend boasts inclusive programming in the way of; the Women’s Healing Space, a writing workshop and a space for women to check in, be seen, heard and affirmed while in community with each other; a screening of #BlackGirlLit: Between Literature, Performance & Memory, a documentary exploring “black woman-ness” and the literary traditions that inform it, featuring artists Ayana Evans, Kal Gezahegn, Dell M. Hamilton, Tsedaye Makonnen, Helina Metaferia and Marceline Mandeng; Social Sunday: Black Ink, a panel discussion interrogating the world of self-publishing and the instance where inspiration leads to action; and more to be announced.


PARTICIPANTS:

3 Dot Zine
Blk Grls Wurld Zine
Brown & Proud Press
Brown Recluse Zine Distro
Codify Art
Collectiva Cosmica
DATE NIGHT
Endless Editions
La Chamba Press
La Liga Zine
Lambey Press
L’ENCHANTEUR
Maroon World
MoCADA Shop
Mohammed Fayez
No Shame Distro
Nontsikelelo Mutiti
Oxford Plain
PJ Gubatina Policarpio
RAFiA SANTANA
Red Hook Editions
True Laurels Magazine
Yellow Jackets Collective