Pre-Order Our Summer Zine

Ahh, it’s crazy y’all. We tried a new printer this time and we are so pleased with the bright colors and glossy pics.

Only did a short run of 30 copies for now but we’ll probably print more for live events as the season kicks off. Keeping our prices under $10 for the youth so head over to Etsy to see the deets on this fun and fresh #blkgrlswurld zine 😘

Supporting Relief Efforts in Puerto Rico

I’ve been struggling to find an organization on the ground in Puerto Rico that I can trust with actually helping victims in real time. Over the past few years we have seen failed relief projects from international non profits like the Red Cross; black and brown bodies lost in Haiti and New Orleans because of poor leadership and the mismanagement of funds. When I donate I want to make sure the cash doesn’t get chipped off into some millionaire’s pocket.

I’ve finally found an organization that is vouched for by Ms. Cruz, the Mayor of San Juan Puerto Rico who has been in the trenches since the beginning. Operation Blessing has come up often during her interviews about first responders and in the video below she confirms it. Let’s all continue to donate goods, services and funding to the local orgs on the island and other teams that are really trying to make an impact down there.

Furthermore, its important that we check on the checks we write, lets not lose sight of these relief programs 6 months from now. We should all try to check in and see if organizations are making an impact and how we can continue to help.

More details on supporting Operation Blessing > https://www.ob.org/disaster-relief/

#Blkgrlswurld featured in Tom Tom Magazine :D

Yassss! Tom Tom is a magazine for female drummers and musicians, and we’ve been featured in their 31st issue! It’s based in NYC and it does so much great work inspiring women musicians and kicking serious ass in the rock scene. We are so honored they took an interest in our Black Girls Dreaming Coloring Book and chose to feature a review of that work by writer, Lola Johnson. Thank you Tom Tom Mag 😀

You can order their latest issue Online HERE

Print versions are available across the nation in shops like Barnes and Nobel. Check out more of the funky femme talent they’ve been dishing at http://tomtommag.com/

Zine Event June 27th @ Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture

Ahhh! Our fav Harlem spot to uncover Black history is hosting a zine event this week and we’ll have a table 😀 😀 😀 Tuesday, June 27, 2017, Zine Fair from 4-6pm followed by Panel Talk at 6:30 p.m.

We love every chance to expose young brown folks to alternative music and media that represents and validates our shared quirky, sometimes geeky interests. #PUNXSOFCOLOR

giphy

Zines: Elaborate Disruption and Black Creativity

“The resurgence of zines—self-published limited-distribution works—is stemming the tide of erasure, disrupting publishing, and offering creative spaces for diverse voices within marginalized communities. Remembering zines like FIRE!!, created in 1926 and “devoted to the young negro artist,” author Steven G. Fullwood will join in conversation with contemporary zine creators Devin N. Morris (3 Dot Zine), Nontsikelelo Mutiti (Nontsi), Kevin Harry (KHzines), and Jermel Moody (maple:koyo) to elaborate on their zine-making practices and impact on publishing and creativity. The program will also feature a marketplace of zines selected in collaboration with Morris, Moody, and the Schomburg Shop.

FIRE!! contributors included Harlem Renaissance figures Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston and Aaron Douglas.

@SchomburgCenter #SchomburgZineFair

First come, first seated

For free events, we generally overbook to ensure a full house. All registered seats are released 15 to 30 minutes before start time, so we recommend that you arrive early.”

Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture | 515 Malcolm X Boulevard | New York, NY 10037

#heavygirlsloveheavymusic

 

#Blkgrlswurld @ Brown Paper Zine Fair Jan. 28-29, 2017

#Blkgrlswurld ZINE will be selling our latest editions and coloring books Jan, 28-29th, 2017 at the Brown Paper Zine and Small Press Fair for Black and PoC Artists. The free event takes place at the Museum of Contemporary African Diasporan Arts (MoCADA). Details below.

MoCADA (80 Hanson Place, Brooklyn, NY) – 1st and 4th Floors Free RSVP

We are also thrilled to participate in a panel discussion on Sunday during the zine fair, moderated by Kimberly Drew. Social Sunday: Black Ink Zine Panel Sunday, January 29, 2:30-4pm Free RSVP

3 Dot Zine presents its first installment of the Brown Paper Zine and Small Press Fair for Black and PoC Artists as a part of programming for Diagram of the Heart, by Glenna Gordon, currently on view at the Museum of Contemporary African Diasporan Arts (MoCADA).

3 Dot Zine is a collaborative submission based zine founded by artist Devin N Morris in 2014 as a way to extend the reach of important dialogues Morris was having with his peers.Throughout his time participating in zine fairs and festivals in New York, Baltimore, and Philadelphia, he noticed a lack of Black and People of Color (PoC) representation within these environments, which stood in stark contrast to the diverse independent publishing communities Morris found himself apart of.

As such, the Brown Paper Zine and Small Press Fair was created to provide a space where the creative efforts of Black and PoC artists working in print mediums could be exposed and proliferated. Bringing together established zine makers, small presses, and artists working in print mediums to MoCADA, the fair asks each participant to seek out new and young artists to showcase their zines, or facilitate the production of their print-based work. In addition to encouraging young artists to use zines as a viable, independent avenue for sharing their work, this effort also acquaints young makers with the communities that fairs create.

The Brown Paper Zine and Small Press Fair will occupy multiple locations within the MoCADA building as the weekend boasts inclusive programming in the way of; the Women’s Healing Space, a writing workshop and a space for women to check in, be seen, heard and affirmed while in community with each other; a screening of #BlackGirlLit: Between Literature, Performance & Memory, a documentary exploring “black woman-ness” and the literary traditions that inform it, featuring artists Ayana Evans, Kal Gezahegn, Dell M. Hamilton, Tsedaye Makonnen, Helina Metaferia and Marceline Mandeng; Social Sunday: Black Ink, a panel discussion interrogating the world of self-publishing and the instance where inspiration leads to action; and more to be announced.


PARTICIPANTS:

3 Dot Zine
Blk Grls Wurld Zine
Brown & Proud Press
Brown Recluse Zine Distro
Codify Art
Collectiva Cosmica
DATE NIGHT
Endless Editions
La Chamba Press
La Liga Zine
Lambey Press
L’ENCHANTEUR
Maroon World
MoCADA Shop
Mohammed Fayez
No Shame Distro
Nontsikelelo Mutiti
Oxford Plain
PJ Gubatina Policarpio
RAFiA SANTANA
Red Hook Editions
True Laurels Magazine
Yellow Jackets Collective

Bringing In The Asexual New Year

Dec. 31, 2016

I’m outside the Harlem Target store loading up my new kitchen appliances when suddenly a little old lady approaches me. With a smile across her face she exclaims,  “Ah! Bringing in the new year with a fresh start eh?”

I shrug bashfully, “Sure, sure.”

She nods knowingly, “I gave up new year resolutions ages ago, but a friend of mine, she’s a bit older than me, she told me a good one to try is having less sex. Hehehe.”

I nod and smile, “Indeed.”

Sometimes it’s bewildering even to me that I’m in my late twenties and still identifying as the same asexual I’ve always been since age 5. Back when I first learned of frogs that could reproduce without mating with an opposite sex. “That’s me,” I’d tell my parents, “I stand on my own. I’m asexual.” I’ve always struggled to understand why people strive to pair up or find each other sexually attractive. Why would anyone need to be so…close?

Of course they passed it off as silliness but by the time I was in the 5th grade the pressure was real to claim at least one boy attractive; to recognize the innate game of cat and mouse between the genders. My parents didn’t care if it was someone I knew, a celebrity or a damn cartoon character, I could feel them searching for “normal development” behavior and that there would be social consequences for not fitting in. Was I mentally falling behind my peers? Gay? Emotionally immature?  I caught on quickly that I needed to start acting ‘normal’ and began lying about boys on TV I thought were “Cute” or “Crush-worthy.” The look of approval from them when I did this made my stomach churn.

Stereotypes of Black women in the United States are hyper-sexualized to a caricature level. As a brainy femme teenager the expectation that I would fail in life was everywhere, from the Black community in my home to my white peers at our rural suburban high school. There are countless moments where my brown skin felt like a magnet for sexual advances. “Black girls are fast, Black girls are trouble, Black girls are easy and their bodies develop too early. They’re boy crazy and obsessed with babies.” –Total bullshit I still hear from my elders today.

I understood some of the discrimination I was getting at school surrounded by whites who’d only ever seen black people on the BET cable network booty popping (a channel they were proud to sneak a peek at when their parents weren’t home). But what hurt my feelings more was how often my relatives spoke of good clean girls vs. nasty fast girls – lecturing my parents on how to keep my sister and I in check of our hormones.

But quite the opposite was happening in our home. Our hormones were quite fine. I was a tomboy that didn’t talk about crushes, never asked about dating, and knew my helicopter parents were worried I was gay. (To this day they don’t believe asexuality exists. Everyone loves sex!)

Up until grad school it would bother me sometimes that my lack of interest in connecting with others in a romantic way hadn’t changed. I’d never so much as kissed another person but also didn’t want to do those things and had a hard time relating why anyone would want to. My fun was music, writing, art-making, conversation.  I saw the sexual currency people exchanged and consistently felt isolated from that market.(i.e. flirting through a job interview, the benefit of combined household income, professional approval…)

But the simple truth for many asexuals is, we’re solid in who we are. There isn’t a feeling of something missing, if sex never came up in our lives we’d never notice. It’s why I’m so surprised when people discuss their fear of being alone. Is it that scary taking care of yourself? Fighting your own battles?

I have friends, family and community just like you. I stand on my own and I’m cool with that, I’m building a life around that and enjoy what I do. I try to keep my mind open to having a platonic partner one day but honestly…I’m indifferent.

So you may be wondering why asexuals are coming out more and more, with some flowing into LGBTQA activism.

  1. We are “other” and therefore subject to many of the same discriminations and violence. Especially young people of color. When a homophobic family member suspects your sexuality is anything other than hetero, they rarely wait around to hear you explain asexuality. And because our society is that sex obsessed it’s not likely they would believe you. To them it’s just another gay person trying to hide in plain sight.
  2. People grow. Some of us reach asexuality later in life or fall somewhere else on the Spectrum. Maybe we already have children or have identified as gay most of our lives and now feel differently about our attraction to others. That doesn’t necessarily mean we stop having romantic relationships or stop identifying as queer.
  3. It’s only one part of ourselves. Queer, trans and non-binary folk can also be asexual. Some peoples feelings around attraction shift over time and it’s all about learning and understanding yourself better.
  4. We are not against sexuality in any way and support everyone’s journey. Granted I don’t like media propagating sex as a life or death need, but I love seeing my friends freely expressing themselves and loving who they love. You do you! It’s all about  everyone living their truth  without the threat of violence or discrimination from opportunity.

I believe anyone who supports shifting this cis-gender patriarchal system should join forces and build a stronger inter-sectional community of love and respect. Especially in 2017. This is a moment where the powers-that-be will strive to divide us and create doubt within our movements. It is critical that we support each other.

~ C.L

.

P.S > *USA Womens March Jan, 21 2017

#blacklivesmatter #feministkilljjoy #qwoc #equality #asexual #pride #lgbtqa

 

 

 

Blkgrlswurld Autumn Edition 4.3 Now Online

She’s finally arrived, the latest edition can be found at the link below. This season’s book features artwork by Trifecta Studios and a short story we crafted during November’s National Novel Writing Month.

Later this week on Dec. 15th, we’ll be reading from the book & performing a bit of music in Brooklyn at Pioneer Works Book Shop. Details in the poster below.

See you in the pit! \m/

Edition 4.3 | December 2016 | View PDF Here


 

Making Simple Hardcover Books At Home

Making handmade books is a great way to present your work and we’ve found it a calming craft to keep our hands busy.

There are many traditional bookmaking styles out there to ensure your book or journal remains archival and well bound – standing the test of time. This tutorial will be a faster version, for folks who just need a quick journal. The pages won’t be stitched with some elaborate thread binding, this will be a single book signature with 1 knot tying the pages together at the seam.

Materials needed:

  1. Bone folder
  2. 10-15 sheets of your preferred paper (we just used some old French Paper Co. Samples)
  3. pH Neutral PVA Glue (reduces chances of the glue eating away at the paper over time)
  4. Paintbrush or Stippling Brush for gluing (remember to keep wet in a jar while working)
  5. Exacto Knife & Cutting Board
  6. Chip Board (Comes in various widths but the backs of old sketchbooks are usually fine)
  7. Pencil and Ruler for marking where to cut

photo-nov-26-2-40-00-pm

First, fold some sheets of 8.5 x11in paper in half, later on we’ll sew a bit of string in the folded seam to keep the pages together


photo-nov-26-3-02-24-pm

Cut down 2 pieces of chip board for the hardcover, this board is from the back of an old sketchbook- it should be at least a centimeter larger than the paper to protect the pages


photo-nov-26-3-26-28-pm

We’ll connect the two hardcovers together before adding the book-cloth, measure how wide the cloth should be by how it fits with the pages. We want about .5inches of the paper to touch the book-cloth the way an old Composition notebook might.


photo-nov-26-3-27-30-pm

Use the Bone folder to burnish out any air pockets from the PVA glue to make sure the cloth dries smoothly


photo-nov-26-3-32-26-pm

The sheets we use for the cover should be 1 inch or more longer than the board on all sides to fold around it (just about any paper works for bookmaking, it doesn’t have to be book-cloth)


photo-nov-26-3-52-29-pm

Glue down the outer cover first, then flip over to glue down each tab- slightly trimming the corner will help to make folding the tabs cleaner


photo-nov-26-5-51-48-pm

Example of the 2nd book having the tabs glued down


photo-nov-26-3-47-32-pm

When gluing, be sure to use the bone folder to remove any creases or air bubbles


photo-nov-26-4-00-41-pm

For a quick book like this we’re leaving out these tabs to glue onto the inner page seam-its a quick way to make sure the page signature is securely fitted into the hardcover


photo-nov-26-4-17-52-pm

There a few ways to secure the pages: putting down the inner pages first like this ensures the edges are even, but it may look uneven on the first page..


photo-nov-26-4-49-09-pm

The best way is to attach tabs on each side of the booklet.


photo-nov-26-4-49-14-pm

The seam with 2 tabs and a sewn knot in the signature.


photo-nov-26-6-50-26-pm

When gluing down the booklet we added glue to the tabs and the book-cloth all along the seam.


photo-nov-27-3-10-13-pm

After the booklet is glued down it is further secured by this additional layer of the inner cover sheets. it would take alot for these ages to fall out of this bind now.

Final step: Once the last bit of glue is secure, immediately stack your book in a safe, dry place and pile as many heavy flat items you can find to press the book down with weight. Leave the book pressed for at least 12hours. This will make sure the book cover and pages don’t buckle from the glue and everything dries flat.

I usually secure my books between sheets of chipboard and stack my macbook pro, along with big textbooks books and such on top for added weight. 😉

Annnnd you made it! Be sure to tag us on Instagram and share with us your progress-happy printing! @blkgrlswurld_zine

zines

Your Voice Matters: Register To Vote

This is quick reminder from all of us at #Blkgrlswurld Zine to please register to vote so that you can participate in the November U.S. Presidential election. If you notice ads or billboards telling you its too late or that you may not qualify, IGNORE them – double check with the offices that know for sure like your local DMV or Secretary of State Office.

For NYC folks the deadline to register by mail is October 14, 2016. HeadCount.Org offers voter info for every state if you live elsewhere. New Yorkers can also register to vote online through the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV)

Forget about the news, and what your friends are saying or what social media is saying about the presidential race. We don’t have a crystal ball to look ahead and see where all of this lands, but the one valuable thing each of us can do is participate in voting.

The presidential election takes place on November 8th, 2016.

And if you Really want to see some change in your community, spend an afternoon on Google checking out your local representatives who are also on the ballot towards making a more informed decision that will have direct impact on your block. Its more valuable than donating to that cool project you just saw on Kickstarter, we promise…

xoxo